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Evaluation of Significance

STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

There are  four constraints for a building to be considered on the National Register which the United States Department of State uses as a guide to determine the cultural significance of America properties abroad.  The building must be associated with historic events, it must be associated with historical people, have significance due to architecture, or have significance due to archaeology. The Winfield house contains elements of all four of these characteristics, with significance due to architecture being the strongest element.

PERIOD OF SIGNIFICANCE

The significance due to architecture can be further broken down into sub categories. The building must meet at least one of these categories, but typically will fit into multiple categories. These categories consist of,  (1) distinctive characteristics of a type, style, or method of construction, (2) contains the work of a famous builder, designer, or architect, or (3) having high artistic value. The primary period of significance of the Winfield House is between 1938 and 1969. It is significant as an English Neo-Georgian structure and as an American Colonial Revival style.

SIGNIFICANCE DUE TO PEOPLE AND EVENTS

Winfield House is significant because it was built by an American heiress of the Woolworth fortune, Barbara Hutton, and with American money. It is also significant as an American Ambassador’s residence to the Court of St. James’s and for the important diplomatic events that took place within it.